My current HF rig is a Yaesu FTDX10.  I just purchased this radio in January 2023.  This is the first HF rig I’ve bought and I couldn’t be more pleased with the purchase.  I purchased the M-90 desktop microphone and, since the entire family doesn’t enjoy the hobby as much as me, I also got the Heil HC-6 Pro-Micro headset and FS-3 foot pedal.

My grandfather's old Heathkit SB-101.  Station consists of the transceiver, power supply/speaker, and phone patch/timer.

My grandfather's old Heathkit SB-101. Station consists of the transceiver, power supply/speaker, and phone patch/timer.

Prior to this new radio, I was using my grandfather’s Heathkit SB-101.  It’s a great tube rig that is well above my operating skills.  Tuning the finals is an art form of its own.  I also have the combination speaker/power supply and the timer/phone patch.

My EFHW is resonant on 10, 15, 20, and 40 meters.  Originally a temporary get-on-the-air-quick antenna it's found a permanent in my backyard.

My EFHW is resonant on 10, 15, 20, and 40 meters. Originally a temporary get-on-the-air-quick antenna it's found a permanent in my backyard.

My base antennas are an EFHW for HF and a vertical for VHF/UHF.

My EFHW is the DIY kit from ARRL.  It cost $65 and took about an hour to build the toroid box.  I strung it up along the block wall fence for a few weeks while we ran the coax, drilled holes in the wall,  and built the entrance panel.  Once all that was done, I sent my son aloft on a two-story ladder and we installed it about 17 feet up on the roof with the other end sloping down to the mast for the vertical antenna.

The VHF/UHF verical is a Comet GP-3.  It performs great and coverage of the Antelope Valley is excellent from my QTH at 3,030′ MSL.

In addition to the HF rig, I pulled my Yaesu FTM-400D out of my commuter vehicle and installed it as my permanent VHF/UHF rig in the “shack.”

About that…my so-called shack is little more than the right half of my computer desk.  I picked up a butcher block countertop from the hardware store and mounted a couple of table legs.

Both my HF and my VHF/UHF rigs are powered by the Astron SS-50M-AP.  It puts out 40 amps continuous with peaks of 50 amps.  I wanted enough power to run both radios simultaneously and this power supply does the trick.

I found I wasn’t using all the bells and whistles of the FTM-400D while driving back and forth to work so I replaced it with the Yaesu FTM-6000R.  It’s easy to operate and has enough power to hit all the local repeaters out here in the middle of nowhere.

I also have a few HT’s.

Not pictured is my Yaesu FT-60.  This radio is a beast!  I took it (along with a spare battery) on a 10 day, 110 miles backpacking trip with our Boy Scout Troop through the mountains of northern New Mexico at the Philmont Scout Ranch.  It fell off my pack more times than I could count but it kept on working like a champ.

My main HT is the FT3D.  Its a little more delicate but does all the extras like APRS, C4FM, and WIRES-X.  I also use it with my Arrow yagi anntenna when I work the ham radio satellites.

And of course everyone needs a Baofeng so I picked up the UV5R.  It does the job which is to say it lives in drop charger on my desk and hardly ever gets used unless I need two-way comms around the house.  My son is going to Neotropolis in April and I think he may take it with him.  It’s inexpensive enough that I won’t be too disappointed if it doesn’t make it home.